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6. The blue tit (“tit” derived from the Old Norse word meaning tiny)

6. The blue tit (“tit” derived from the Old Norse word meaning tiny)

We are common in Britain and most parts of Europe. Our appearance is as a small, very active and dainty bird (12cm/4.5 inches in length), often hanging upside down, and we love to roam around gardens, hedgerows, parkland and deciduous woodland. You recognize us by […]

5. The red-necked phalarope (known as the peerie (small) duck in the Shetland Isles, and a species where the matriarch is the dominant sex)

5. The red-necked phalarope (known as the peerie (small) duck in the Shetland Isles, and a species where the matriarch is the dominant sex)

We are a wading and swimming bird, but not a member of the duck family, and rarely are seen in Britain. We are on that country’s list of endangered species. A few of us breed in the extreme north of mainland Scotland, the Shetland Isles […]

4. The northern fulmar (name derived from old Viking language of “ful” meaning foul and “mar” translated as gull)

4. The northern fulmar (name derived from old Viking language of “ful” meaning foul and “mar” translated as gull)

There are around 500,000 northern fulmars that breed in colonies throughout Britain on steep cliffs at places such as St Kilda (Outer Western Isles, Scotland), Foul (Shetland), Dunstanburgh Castle (Northumberland), Flamborough Head and Bempton Cliffs (Yorkshire), Skomer, south Wales and Lizard Point, Cornwall.  Worldwide there […]

3. The long-billed dowitcher (also known as the red-breasted snipe or brownback)

3. The long-billed dowitcher (also known as the red-breasted snipe or brownback)

Since most of the world’s estimated 500,000 long-billed dowitchers breed in North America, we prefer to be called shorebirds rather than by the British term wader. In the United States, the word wader refers only to long-legged birds such as storks and herons whereas our […]

2. The Migrant Whitethroat (known as the nettle-creeper or hay chat in certain parts of Britain)

2. The Migrant Whitethroat (known as the nettle-creeper or hay chat in certain parts of Britain)

I’m a member of the warbler family, about the size of an English robin or great tit, and weigh approximately half an ounce (15 grams), so you can imagine what happens to me when it’s windy. To know that I’m a male, you have to […]

1. The Resident Merlin (or Pigeon Hawk in North America)

1. The Resident Merlin (or Pigeon Hawk in North America)

I think we merlins are delightful to look at as the smallest birds of prey in Britain, even smaller than kestrels. Our name is derived from esmerillon, the old French name for our species. We have pointed wings and a relatively long tail that steer […]

Welcome to my Blog: An Awareness of  Birds, etc.

Welcome to my Blog: An Awareness of Birds, etc.

Thank you for visiting my author Blog page. Given my lifelong hobby of birdwatching, during the coming months I intend to publish summaries of  birds that I am familiar with. The purpose is to inform and help readers identify species, know where they maybe found […]